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The Business Guide to Ransomware, Part 2

The Business Guide to Ransomware, Part 2, is our second post in this series of defensive information you need to know, that will absolutely save your company if you are one of the unfortunate ones forced into finding backup copies of your database after you’ve been successfully attacked. This truly is critical information for all companies who depend upon access to the data that runs all businesses.

How Ransomware is spread

Spam is the most common method for distributing ransomware. It is generally spread using some form of social social engineering; victims are tricked into downloading an e-mail attachment or clicking a link. Fake email messages might appear to be a note from a friend or colleague asking a user to check out an attached file, for example. Or, email might appear to come from a trusted institution (such as a bank) asking you to perform a routine task. Sometimes, ransomware uses scare tactics such as claiming that the computer has been used for illegal activities to coerce victims. Once the user takes action, the malware installs itself on the system and begins encrypting files. It can happen in the blink of an eye with a single click.

Another common method for spreading ransomware is a software package known as an exploit kit. These packages are designed to identify vulnerabilities and exploit them to install ransomware. In this type of attack, hackers install code on a legitimate website that redirects computer users to a malicious site. Unlike the spam method, sometimes this approach requires no additional actions from the victim. This is referred to as a “drive-by download” attack. The most common exploit kit in use today is known as Angler. A May 2015 study conducted by security software vendor Sophos showed that thousands of new web pages running Angler are created every day. The Angler exploit kit uses HTML and JavaScript to identify the victim’s browser and installed plugins, which allows the hacker to select an attack that is the most likely to be successful. Using a variety of obfuscation techniques, Angler is constantly evolving to evade detection by security software products. Angler is just one exploit kit; there are a variety of others in use today as well. Spam botnets and exploit kits are relatively easy to use, but require some level of technical proficiency. However, there are also options available for the aspiring hackers with minimal computer skills. According to McAfee, there are ransomware as-a-service offerings hosted on the Tor network, allowing just about anyone to conduct these types of attacks.

In our next post, Part 3, we’ll continue with this series on with the Business Guide To Ransomware by introducing you to the common types of Ransomware.

In the meantime, if you would like more information on Data Backup and Disaster Recovery, download your Free Business Advisory Guide Here.

Don’t worry about some sales guy calling you from our office because you downloaded information off of our website. No one from our office will call you; I promise. We don’t like sales calls any more than you do! We understand if you’re not ready to do that, and if that’s the case, then just read these posts when they come out. We post on a regular schedule.

If you would like to chat about this, or anything call us at 503.359.1275

Dedicated to your success,

Wally Moore
dts|infotech . . . computer networks that work
www.dtsinfotech.com
503.359.1275

 
 

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